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Learn to apologize for fun and profit

By Lisa Neal / December 2007

TYPE: OPINION
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Sometimes I have mental mash-ups where disparate ideas merge in my head. My latest mash-up combined a Fortune magazine article with a conversation I had with a friend, Hal, who has been working with a life coach to identify what he loves to do that can also earn an income. The Fortune article correlated the likelihood of apologizing with salary. It quoted a study that said "a person's willingness to apologize was an almost perfect predictor of their place on the income ladder" and extrapolated that apologizing "now and then is an indicator of strong people skills, essential for moving up in almost any organization." My idea was to teach people apologizing through-you guessed it-e-learning.

I imagined the course. I would use video to depict scenarios in which problems occur and an apology is offered. Since the study showed that the highest earners apologized more regardless of whether they believed they were at fault or not, the videos would have to include a wide variety of situations. Students could decide whether the apology was delivered effectively for the situation. And to encourage reflection, students could be further asked what they would do in the same situation. Then there would be additional scenarios and a coach would discuss student responses, offering feedback by phone or email. Students would be asked to try out their skills in real-life situations and report back to their coach.

I don't know what the course would cost to develop, although producing video and providing coaching can be expensive. But the cost might be insignificant compared to the resulting earnings, not to mention family harmony.

An online pearl merchant commissioned this study because it noticed that "a growing number of customers, when asked the reason for their pearl purchases, replied that the baubles were given as an apology, usually to a wife or girlfriend." I might contact the merchant to see if they want to sponsor this course. Either that or the AMA, the American Management Association, since this could aid in better leadership and workplace skills, or perhaps the other AMA, the American Medical Association, since there has been a lot of interest in the role of apology in reducing medical malpractice.

Here we are quickly approaching New Year's Eve, a time when so many make resolutions. I'll bet "I'll lose weight" (how many calories can I save by giving up Caramel Frappuccinos?) surpasses "I'll earn more money" at the top of the list. What about resolving to take a course to learn to say "I'm sorry"?



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ADDITIONAL READING

    Lisa Neal
  1. Q&A
  2. Storytelling at a distance
  3. Talk to me
  4. Q&A with Diana Laurillard
  5. Online learning and fun
  6. Everything in moderation
  7. eLearning and fun
  8. The basics of e-learning
  9. Is it live or is it Memorex?
  10. 5 questions... for Richard E. Mayer
  11. My life as a Wikipedian
  12. Five questions...for Elliott Masie
  13. Five Questions... for John Seely Brown
  14. Five questions...for Lynn Johnston
  15. Five questions…for Matt DuPlessie
  16. Do it yourself
  17. Predictions for 2004
  18. When will e-learning reach a tipping point?
  19. Q&A with Saul Carliner
  20. "Deep" thoughts
  21. "Spot Learning"
  22. The stripper and the bogus online degree
  23. Five questions...for Tom Carey
  24. Learner on the Orient Express
  25. Five (or six) questions...for Irene McAra-McWilliam
  26. How to get students to show up and learn
  27. Blended conferences
  28. Predictions for 2002
  29. Learning from e-learning
  30. Q&A with Don Norman
  31. In search of simplicity
  32. Five Questions...for Christopher Dede
  33. Want better courses?
  34. Designing usable, self-paced e-learning courses
  35. Just "DO IT"
  36. Senior service
  37. Formative evaluation
  38. Blogging to learn and learning to blog
  39. Predictions for 2007
  40. Not all the world's a stage
  41. Five questions...for Seb Schmoller
  42. Do distance and location matter in e-learning?
  43. Why do our K-12 schools remain technology-free?
  44. Degrees by mail
  45. The Value of Voice
  46. Predictions for 2006
  47. Five questions...for Shigeru Miyagawi
  48. Five questions...
  49. Five questions...for Larry Prusack
  50. Five questions...for Karl M. Kapp
  51. Music lessons
  52. Advertising or education?
  53. Of web hits and Britney Spears
  54. Predictions for 2008
  55. Serious games for serious topics
  56. Back to the future
  57. Predictions For 2003