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How to get students to show up and learn

By Lisa Neal / July 2002

TYPE: OPINION
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No one has exact numbers, but there is a general agreement that attrition is higher in online courses than in classroom-delivered courses. High drop-out rates have been attributed to the demographics of online students, the inexperience of online faculty, poorly designed e-learning technologies, flawed course design, and low bandwidth. Whatever the root cause, I believe the problem can be largely solved through accountability. But how can student accountability be achieved?

In my own online teaching, mostly blended courses for corporate training, I ask my students to let me know in advance if they will miss a synchronous session. They always tell me and always have good reasons—it's hard, under the circumstances, to use a trivial one. I greet each student at the beginning of class and often call on a student to lead a discussion or summarize a reading assignment. I occasionally call on people during class if I haven't heard from them or think they might have insights on a topic. This adds accountability—for the students to show up, be prepared, stay focused, and participate.

My goal is for my students to learn, but to accomplish that I need to get them to class, get them to do their assignments, and keep them from playing solitaire or reading their email during class. I try to create an environment that fosters personal responsibility. While I prefer that this happen because a discussion is fascinating, I'm willing to have them become more attentive because they don't want to be called on when unprepared or distracted.

When one is young, success in school is largely based on showing up and displaying appropriate behavior. As one gets older, there's more intrinsic motivation arising from the desire to learn or the need for professional achievement. But even an intrinsically motivated student has to squeeze an online class into a busy day. That's why accountability is so important.

The last time I was required to take an online course, I took it on a Saturday, the last day I could complete it without being labeled a "no-show." Since I prefer to be recognized for my accomplishments rather than for my oversights, this motivated me to finally take the class, after over two weeks of trying to fit it in every day. Is that accountability? Yes. Did it motivate me? Yes. But my focus was on passing the test, not understanding and mastering the material.

A teacher who creates an accountability-focused learning environment can show students how the content of a course is relevant and useful, and therefore worthy of attendance and attention. One should build enthusiasm and provide context for students so they understand how to apply what they are learning. This should be the goal in any teaching environment, but it's harder to achieve online—as high drop-out rates reveal. But that's the sort of challenge that makes teaching worthwhile.



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ADDITIONAL READING

    Lisa Neal
  1. Designing usable, self-paced e-learning courses
  2. Just "DO IT"
  3. Senior service
  4. Formative evaluation
  5. Blogging to learn and learning to blog
  6. Predictions for 2007
  7. Not all the world's a stage
  8. Five questions...for Seb Schmoller
  9. Do distance and location matter in e-learning?
  10. Why do our K-12 schools remain technology-free?
  11. Degrees by mail
  12. The Value of Voice
  13. Predictions for 2006
  14. Five questions...for Shigeru Miyagawi
  15. Five questions...
  16. Five questions...for Larry Prusack
  17. Five questions...for Karl M. Kapp
  18. Music lessons
  19. Learn to apologize for fun and profit
  20. Advertising or education?
  21. Of web hits and Britney Spears
  22. Predictions for 2008
  23. Serious games for serious topics
  24. Back to the future
  25. Predictions For 2003
  26. Q&A
  27. Storytelling at a distance
  28. Talk to me
  29. Q&A with Diana Laurillard
  30. Online learning and fun
  31. Everything in moderation
  32. eLearning and fun
  33. The basics of e-learning
  34. Is it live or is it Memorex?
  35. Five Questions... for John Seely Brown
  36. 5 questions... for Richard E. Mayer
  37. My life as a Wikipedian
  38. Five questions...for Elliott Masie
  39. Five questions...for Lynn Johnston
  40. Five questions…for Matt DuPlessie
  41. Do it yourself
  42. Predictions for 2004
  43. "Spot Learning"
  44. When will e-learning reach a tipping point?
  45. Q&A with Saul Carliner
  46. "Deep" thoughts
  47. The stripper and the bogus online degree
  48. Five questions...for Tom Carey
  49. Learner on the Orient Express
  50. Five (or six) questions...for Irene McAra-McWilliam
  51. Blended conferences
  52. Predictions for 2002
  53. Learning from e-learning
  54. Q&A with Don Norman
  55. In search of simplicity
  56. Five Questions...for Christopher Dede
  57. Want better courses?