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Design For Learning

See All Design For Learning Articles

Designing for Social Connectivity (Not Everyone Likes Webcams)

By William P Lord / April 30, 2021

COVID-19 has forced vast numbers of educational institutions to shift their operations from being delivered face-to-face to being delivered online. As a result, academic institutions have had to scramble to find complex solutions that meet systems-wide online teaching and learning needs. The quality of interaction that occurs between the educator and the student is crucial to the success of delivering education via online technologies, and it is incumbent on the host institution to provide a usable, effective, and satisfying form of communication all participants may communicate with while maintaining a sense of social presence. It requires little effort to compile a list of potential benefits of using webcams in educational settings. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING

The Burden of Alleviating the Burden During a Pandemic: Emotional literacy as a tool for online course design, adaptation, and evaluation

By Petra Robinson, Maja Stojanović / April 23, 2021

During the COVID-19 pandemic, most, if not all, courses were shifted to online learning formats. In this article, we share our experiences related to teaching and learning in a completely online, condensed (seven-week) graduate-level course during the fall 2020 semester. More specifically, we discuss the important role of emotional literacy as a mechanism for framing online course design, adaptation, and evaluation. We explore emotional literacy in terms of its necessity in teaching and learning in online contexts during a pandemic, beyond the scope of other obviously important non-traditional literacies, such as technological and informational literacies. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION

Facilitating Inspiration: Design of the Textiles Archive Design Application (TADA)

By Dan Spencer, Chris Willis, David Tredwell, Jessica White, Kayla Briska / December 10, 2020

A key goal of textile design education is to provide students entering the field opportunities to develop a strong design process, and beginning students, in particular, must learn about helpful concept development resources and how to use them to initiate design work and provide direction for further research. In addition, sources of inspiration serve an important role in the development of the design process by activating, prompting, and guiding designers? activities. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION

Facing Global Health Crises Using Mobile Communications: An international virtual exchange experience

By Rosalie Barreto Belian, Lucas Sampaio Leite, José Luiz Lima-Filho, Laura Geer / July 30, 2020

This work reports on an international virtual exchange experience based on a digital health discipline that embedded a shared module with curricula addressing mobile communications to face health crises. This course took place in the context of COIL through a partnership between the Federal University of Pernambuco and the SUNY Downstate School of Public Health. The purpose of the experience was for students to develop skills to collaborate in teams made up of health professionals from different countries. The students were able to analyze specific population contexts concerning their communication resources and propose mobile communication strategies to face health crises. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

Creating an Active Learning Environment using Reproducible Data Science Tools

By Randal Burns / June 30, 2020

After a decade of struggle to help students install and launch machine virtual machines in the cloud, the author migrated his computer science course to the Gigantum data science platform, which automates the delivery of complex software configurations. The goal was to make it easier for students to complete projects so that they could focus on programming rather than system administration. In the process, lectures were redesigned into an active learning experience in Jupyter notebooks in which students run and modify examples as they are presented and can reproduce exactly all work that they have done or has been demonstrated. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION

Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Through Video-Based, Universally Designed Assessment

By Janet Zydney, Casey Hord, Kathy Koenig / May 31, 2020

The problem with many assessments is they impose barriers for students with learning disabilities who struggle with memory and information processing. Traditional assessments often present multiple pieces of information at one time through written text, which can challenge students who have difficulty processing, storing, and integrating multiple pieces of information simultaneously. Simple text-to-speech or computerized read-aloud accommodation cannot address these issues. This is unfair to these students and doesn?t provide an accurate measurement of their knowledge. Therefore, alternative measures that are accessible to students with learning disabilities must be developed. This article will highlight best practices and challenges in creating a video-based, universally designed assessment. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING

Getting Engagement Right

By Clark Quinn / September 12, 2019

Nick Shackleton-Jones' book How People Learn proposes a new model of learning, and implications for design. While the model is questionable--the implications can be derived from more traditional models--the inferred design principles are spot on. This is a good read to think afresh about making learning meaningful. » [Full Article]
REVIEW: LITERATURE, TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING

Multicultural Sensitivity in Course Design

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Amy Hilbelink / July 15, 2019

Because universities are moving more of their courses online in an effort to increase their education footprint and institutional impact by distributing to foreign students, many in online learning courses are becoming more diverse. As course designers, this impact should be taken into consideration when analyzing the student audience and designing any course. This article discusses recent trends in the global online audience, reminds us of assumptions made during the design process that may impact the multicultural audience, and provides suggestions for working around those assumptions. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

Enhancing and Impacting the Online Classroom Environment with Infographics

By Hanadi Hamadi, Frederick R. Kates, George Raul Audi, Samantha A. Larson, Malcolm M. Kates / April 30, 2019

An infographic is a type of picture that, if done correctly, blends complex data with understandable design. College students today are inundated by visually stimulating screen-based environments. Infographics utilize that environment to enhance the process of summarizing educational material. Data visualization can provide students with multiple dimensions of competency including searching, systematic thinking, and effective interdisciplinary teamwork. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING

Engaging Learners in Online Environments Utilizing Universal Design for Learning Principles

By Aleksandra Hollingshead, Davin Carr-Chellman / February 15, 2019

Learner engagement in any instructional environment, including online, is critical to ensuring meaningful learning outcomes. Researchers discuss engagement as a complex construct consisting of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral domains. In e-learning, student engagement is difficult to achieve. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an instructional design framework focused on overcoming barriers to learning and providing learners with multiple ways to engage, receive instruction, and express learning. This framework is based on a premise of variability of all learners and designing learning that is flexible and systematically planned. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING

Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Online Classroom

By Christy M. Rhodes, Steven W. Schmidt / November 30, 2018

The concept of culturally responsive teaching has long been associated with the traditional, face-to-face classroom. However, the growth of distance education has meant that traditional classrooms are being replaced by online courses, and educators who were used to teaching in face-to-face classrooms now find themselves in a very different situation of teaching online. Culturally responsive teaching is important in all classrooms, and it can be done online. This article examines basic principles of culturally responsive teaching in the context of elearning. It focuses on practical ideas for instructors interested in developing their own culturally responsive online teaching skills. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING

The Rise of Learning Engineering

By Ellen Wagner, Jodi Lis / August 7, 2018

The Industry Connections Industry Consortium on Learning Engineering (ICICLE) was formed in 2017 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) as a community-driven platform across sectors to advocate and support the development of the professional and academic disciplines of learning engineering. This article is an invitation to participate. » [Full Article]
TYPE: OPINION, DESIGN FOR LEARNING

Better Assessment

By Clark Quinn / July 13, 2018

Linda B. Nilson provides the rationale for, and mechanisms to achieve, a better approach to assignments. Utilizing competencies, criteria, and a refocus of ownership, she argues for a systematic change, illustrated with many examples. There has been an ongoing search for criteria to improve assessments, and this is a cogent call about why and how to do it. » [Full Article]
REVIEW: LITERATURE, TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING

Four Questions to Ask When Using YouTube in the Classroom

By Christopher Drew / February 20, 2018

With the rise of the flipped classroom concept, videos from platforms such as YouTube are increasingly being embedded in education courses. Teachers use videos they find online not only as stimulus materials, but also because they can explicitly teach concepts to learners. This article proposes teachers reflect on the pedagogical value of such videos before using them as educational materials. Based on constructivist principles that emphasize active learning and critical thinking, four simple questions are presented for teachers to ask about videos that are designed to explicitly teach before selecting them as tools that do teaching their courses. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING