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Higher Education

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Cross-institutional Leadership Collaboration: Toward the development of a peer-mentoring framework of practice in adult online education

By Haijun Kang, Rachel Ohmes / August 25, 2022

Because of high economic volatility, ongoing competition intensification, and the recent COVID-19 global pandemic influence, more and more education institutions are looking for efficient ways to serve their adult learner population. This article introduces a peer-mentoring framework of practice to help education institutions develop healthy cross-institutional leadership collaborations. This framework builds on three pillars: Developing a shared vision, respecting diversity and differences, and streamlining communications. An adult distance education consortium located in the U.S. is discussed as an example to illustrate how this three-pillar peer-mentoring framework of practice can be used to help make cross-institutional leader collaboration a success. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT, MANAGEMENT

Outsourced Professional Development for Online Instructors: Recommendations from research

By Ling Zhao, Raymond Dixon, Tonia Dousay, Ali Carr-Chellman / April 18, 2022

To improve the quality of online teaching, institutions typically provide structured professional development in the form of institutional teaching or learning center programming. This programming typically focuses on teaching and learning quality, transitions to online teaching, pedagogies, and new technologies. This article reports on the use of outsourced professional development along with faculty responses to the program. Use of an outsourced program was attractive to faculty who wanted to have another institution's name on their vita. Seventeen faculty completed the professional development program and eight shared their reflections on this inquiry. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Is My Classroom Flipped? Using Process Mining to Avoid Subjective Perception

By José Francisco dos Santos Neto, Sarajane Marques Peres, Paulo Correia, Marcelo Fantinato / December 31, 2021

Flipped classroom is an active learning method that encourages students to access study material prior to class time. Ensuring the flipping process took place, understanding how it occurred, and verifying whether it produced positive results has been a challenge for lecturers. In this article, we analyze a flipped classroom scenario through process mining techniques. Process mining was applied to an event log provided by a learning management system that supported a particular undergraduate course offering. The outcomes provide evidence for the flip of the classroom, adding precision and reliability to lecturer analyses. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Conversation-Based Assessments: Real-Time Assessment and Feedback

By Seyma N. Yildirim-Erbasli, Okan Bulut / December 24, 2021

In recent years, substantial progress has been made in the application of technology for learning environments to support interaction and learning. However, current digital assessments still need to be modified to measure student learning in more engaging and effective ways. Conversation-based assessment (CBA) advances the conventional digital assessments by creating a conversational environment between test-takers and agents where each test-taker receives feedback for their correct responses and hints or follow-up questions for their incorrect responses through a natural conversation. This work provides a summary of CBAs by discussing their advantages and differences from conventional digital assessments. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

The Power of Weekly Group Video Recordings in Asynchronous Courses

By Danielle Geary / November 10, 2021

Learning modalities and technology offer dozens of ideas on how to teach online, but still, two things often seem to be missing in the online classroom: class interaction and efficient grading and feedback. In this article, the author describes in detail two kinds of weekly recording activities that greatly add to student engagement and learning in asynchronous courses. Students can be a rather passive audience, but they become much more active in group-conversation video recordings in which the instructor is not present but does provide feedback upon review of the recording. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

A future of assessment without testing

Special Issue: Advancing Beyond Multiple Choice eAssessment

By Kristen DiCerbo / September 30, 2021

As with most aspects of life, assessment practices have been challenged by the events of 2020. The combination of the consequences of COVID-19 restrictions and the increased awareness and reckoning with systemic racism requires the field to take a hard look at our assessment systems. The main function of assessment is to gather evidence by which one makes inferences about what people know and can do. Over the past decade, our digital capabilities have increased exponentially and offer the potential to approach assessment differently. We now have digital learning environments that capture the actions of students as they engage in learning activities. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Adaptive knowledge assessment using advanced concept maps with logic branching multiple-choice Google Forms

Special Issue: Advancing Beyond Multiple Choice eAssessment

By António Fonseca, Hugo Faria / September 30, 2021

Concept maps (CM) are a learning tool that has emerged into an efficient e-learning and e-assessment knowledge tool. The aim of this research is to propose and share the most important aspects, practices, and achievements of using, with science teachers and a master student, a combination of a metacognitive tool-advanced concept mapping (ACM) to assess mental models with immediate real-time feedback assessment tool. The use of the logic branching feature of multiple-choice Google Forms (MCGF) may enable teachers to customize surveys and to assess within many students' high order thinking skills, with the convenience and efficiency of an automatic grading system. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Student Interactions in an Introductory Activity of an Online Course by Ethnicity and Gender

By Jon Ernstberger, Justin Fetner, Kyle Gutowski, Patrick J. Riley, Nick Stavrow / September 28, 2021

In an online, general education course, for a course grade, students were to submit video posts to an introductory course activity. Student responses (by text) were also required for that activity. Initial posts and responses were cataloged by race and gender across multiple sections of the course through multiple semesters and years. Statistical tests were performed to analyze mean numbers of responses and determined that evidence supported that different numbers of responses occurred depending on the race or gender of the original poster, but not both the race and the gender. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Preparing Adult Learners for Success in Blended Learning through Onboarding: A pilot study

By Anita Samuel, Steven Durning, Holly Meyer / September 20, 2021

Blended learning offers adult learners unique opportunities for instructional continuity given work and personal commitments. However, learners participating in blended learning may experience a sense of isolation and/or problems with technology. To address the challenges of a blended program, an expanded orientation, called "onboarding," was designed to ensure learners feel connected to their program and clearly understand the programmatic requirements. Onboarding spans six months and includes a series of activities to provide learners with technological, interaction, and self-directed learning skills needed to succeed in a blended program. Results from the evaluation survey reveal that learners feel most engaged with the program through one-to-one interactions with their academic advisors and interactions with peers in an online discussion board. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Gender Differences in Online Learning: Insights from recent graduates

By Melissa Venable / June 28, 2021

How might the online learning experience, and the support required for success, differ for men and women? New survey research captures insights from 505 participants, including 295 women, who graduated from online programs between 2015 and 2020. This article provides an overview of the characteristics of online students, highlighting the challenges female students face and considerations for supporting their success. Differences in demographic characteristics across gender were found in the areas of degree level and academic major, income, age, and ethnic diversity. More men chose computer and information sciences majors, while more women were in healthcare and education. Female students were also younger and at lower income levels than their male counterparts when they were enrolled in their online programs. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

The Burden of Alleviating the Burden During a Pandemic: Emotional literacy as a tool for online course design, adaptation, and evaluation

By Petra Robinson, Maja Stojanović / April 23, 2021

During the COVID-19 pandemic, most, if not all, courses were shifted to online learning formats. In this article, we share our experiences related to teaching and learning in a completely online, condensed (seven-week) graduate-level course during the fall 2020 semester. More specifically, we discuss the important role of emotional literacy as a mechanism for framing online course design, adaptation, and evaluation. We explore emotional literacy in terms of its necessity in teaching and learning in online contexts during a pandemic, beyond the scope of other obviously important non-traditional literacies, such as technological and informational literacies. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION

Strategies to Build Student-to-Student Rapport in Online Adult Learning Courses

By James Kennedy / February 24, 2021

Students in online classes may have difficulty or believe they cannot develop a rapport with fellow students. There is significant research that indicates that this rapport greatly increases the student?s success in a class. Students can easily build rapport in an in-person classroom and often the instructor is not involved. However, in the online classroom, the problem becomes how do students build this rapport when they only see each other in a virtual space in the classroom to help increase their learning and course success. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Attitude of Nigerian Students to Online Learning During the COVID-19 Pandemic

By Ojevwe Blessing Asoro, Oluwaseyitanfunmi Osunade / December 31, 2020

The recent outbreak of the COVID-19 has led to the need for alternate sources of learning for students in tertiary institutions. The use of online learning has been adopted by some students. There has not been any evaluation of students' attitude to online learning during this period. Thus, this study seeks to determine the attitude of higher education students in Nigeria to online learning. Data was collected using an online survey tool. The results show that Nigerian students are engaged in online learning. It was recommended that the certificates be recognized and online learning be introduced to tertiary institutions. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

Facilitating Inspiration: Design of the Textiles Archive Design Application (TADA)

By Dan Spencer, Chris Willis, David Tredwell, Jessica White, Kayla Briska / December 10, 2020

A key goal of textile design education is to provide students entering the field opportunities to develop a strong design process, and beginning students, in particular, must learn about helpful concept development resources and how to use them to initiate design work and provide direction for further research. In addition, sources of inspiration serve an important role in the development of the design process by activating, prompting, and guiding designers? activities. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION

How to create an academic blog: Tone, audience, credibility, and potential currency

By Simon Lambe / November 30, 2020

This case study offers guidance and advice on creating an effective blog, based on the author?s experiences of running his own blog, hosted on WordPress. The article covers some of the essential issues, including tone, audience, credibility, and potential currency, before outlining three key factors that contribute to a successful blog: time, confidence, and forethought. The article provides help to an academic audience in that it offers suggestions around how to soften academic tone for a general audience as well as how blogging could potentially be used in a meaningful way as a form or formative or summative assessment. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Motivating Learning by Playing Animal Crossing New Horizons: A trending game during the COVID-19 pandemic

By Xi Lin, Shu Su / November 25, 2020

The immersive and engaging nature of video games has been a promising and effective environment for learning. This study first introduces a motivational learning framework for game-based learning, then takes a recent popular video game, Animal Crossing New Horizons, as an example to further discuss the application of the motivational learning framework. It is expected that more features will be developed in the future in this game to bring more educational benefits for its players. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, NONFORMAL/INFORMAL LEARNING

Examining Chinese and American Online Learning

By Francis Stonier, Geping Liu, Liang Yu / October 30, 2020

Through a collaborative opportunity, educators from the U.S. and China share examples and comparisons of online learning, or distance education, occurring in their respective nations. This article draws from experience on both sides to explore online course design, learning management systems (LMS), and course evaluation. In all situations, the universities had well developed online offerings for students. However, as LMS and support were similar in the U.S. when compared to Chinese counterparts, variance was visible in a number of areas. Discussion stems from the perceived strengths and weaknesses of distance education foundations, training, and support. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

How Instructors Learn to Teach Online: Considering the past to plan for the future

By Steven Schmidt, Elizabeth M. Hodge, Christina M. Tschida / October 22, 2020

The onset of the COVID-19 Pandemic had major effects on all aspects of higher education, including the way in which courses were taught. Literally, overnight, courses that were taught face-to-face were moved online, and face-to-face instructors of those courses became online educators. Now, several months into the pandemic, it has become clear that instructors at colleges and universities today must be able to teach both online and face-to-face, and they must be able to move from one medium to the other as circumstances dictate. However, that is not easy to do, as learning to teach online takes time, and involves a good deal of effort. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

What Facebook Taught Me About Research

By Lee Heller / September 30, 2020

Distance education has exploded, in recent years, with more students taking online courses than ever before. However, despite the explosion in online course takers, the number of students who are not completing their online degree programs is also growing. Online students report feeling isolation, and a disconnect with their classmates and educational institution. Another phenomenon, social media, has also experienced explosive growth, including the largest in modern society, Facebook. The goal of my research study was to understand if there could be a connection between the use of social media, specifically Facebook and Facebook Messenger, and the isolation that distance students experience. » [Full Article]
TYPE: OPINION, HIGHER EDUCATION

Three Things to Consider Before You Kick Off Synchronous Office Hours in Online Classes

By Nathan Pritts / August 28, 2020

Running synchronous online office hours in a predominantly asynchronous classroom environment presents challenges to the learner as well as to the instructor. Establishing a process, and planning to overcome barriers from both sides, can be broken into a three-step process, which should help teachers, and students operationalize this powerful strategy. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Facing Global Health Crises Using Mobile Communications: An international virtual exchange experience

By Rosalie Barreto Belian, Lucas Sampaio Leite, José Luiz Lima-Filho, Laura Geer / July 30, 2020

This work reports on an international virtual exchange experience based on a digital health discipline that embedded a shared module with curricula addressing mobile communications to face health crises. This course took place in the context of COIL through a partnership between the Federal University of Pernambuco and the SUNY Downstate School of Public Health. The purpose of the experience was for students to develop skills to collaborate in teams made up of health professionals from different countries. The students were able to analyze specific population contexts concerning their communication resources and propose mobile communication strategies to face health crises. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

Creating an Active Learning Environment using Reproducible Data Science Tools

By Randal Burns / June 30, 2020

After a decade of struggle to help students install and launch machine virtual machines in the cloud, the author migrated his computer science course to the Gigantum data science platform, which automates the delivery of complex software configurations. The goal was to make it easier for students to complete projects so that they could focus on programming rather than system administration. In the process, lectures were redesigned into an active learning experience in Jupyter notebooks in which students run and modify examples as they are presented and can reproduce exactly all work that they have done or has been demonstrated. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION

What about online doctoral students? A review of e-Learning literature

By Kristina McGaha, Diana Hart, Wendy Aoki / April 30, 2020

Recent increases in accessibility, enrollment in e-learning, and diversification of distance learning format delivery (such as MOOCs) have put e-learning in a state of perpetual evolution. The result is a dynamic environment where research as recent as five years ago may no longer be relevant. A review of contemporary e-learning research is needed to understand current trends in the industry of e-learning as well as determine where further research is needed. This article describes six themes identified in the literature by reviewing journal articles centric to e-learning from 2014 to 2019 using qualitative content analysis. The themes represent what is largely covered in the literature (e-learning anxiety, e-learning pedagogy, and student-centered models), and what is underserved in the literature?namely the dissemination and investigation of online doctoral programs. » [Full Article]
REVIEW: LITERATURE, TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Helping learners as they construct knowledge: How can instructors leverage research findings

By Viswa K. Viswanathan / March 31, 2020

The author presents research-based principles that can improve the recall of factual subject matter using existing features in LMS tools, apps, and other methods to meet targeted learning goals. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Digital Transformation in Higher Education—Buzzword or Opportunity?

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Cerstin Mahlow, Andreas Hediger / September 20, 2019

We argue that, starting from a sophisticated understanding of "digital," we should develop a corresponding notion of "education" suitable to meet the challenges of the ongoing digital transformation. The central task for higher education institutions is to model the complex networks of digital skills (critical thinking, media literacy, cross-cultural competence, etc.) as a foundation for creating contextualized learning scenarios in the disciplines. The crucial success factor is the reunification of the classroom with the real world. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Blended Learning Research: Components critical to student learning from a meta-analysis

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Leslie Cordie, Xi Lin, William Fowler, Michael Wooten / September 18, 2019

This meta-analysis study examined two broad categories related to student satisfaction: course content and instruction format. A systematic review of the literature using meta-analysis was conducted to both analyze and synthesize data across a large number of studies. The results show that in the higher-education environment, it is essential that both the method of interaction and the content be given purposeful attention during course development and presentation of course curricula. Future research should be aimed at identifying the critical subcomponents of these two categories. Additional research on course design factors in both the online and blended learning environments related to instruction should be conducted. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

The Future of Education: Transforming higher education with integrated competency-based education

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Lisa Bosman / September 10, 2019

Over the past several years, competency-based education has been on the rise for offering vocational education, which prepares people to work in a variety of jobs such as a craft, a trade, or as a technician. However, little progress has taken place and few resources exist that show how to incorporate competency-based education into traditional bachelor's degree programs. The purpose of this article to highlight one university's new approach to transforming global higher education and eLearning with competency-based education. The article provides lessons learned and recommendations for others interested in getting on the higher education transformation bandwagon. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Professional Development for Open Education: The usefulness of a cMOOC

By Jenni Hayman / September 6, 2019

There are two commonly identified obstacles to use of open educational resources (OER) and open educational practices (OEP) in global contexts. These obstacles are awareness and relevant skills. The focus of this article is participant experiences in a cMOOC designed to address these challenges. In June 2018, a group of post-secondary educators engaged in an open course they identified as useful for increasing their awareness and their capacity for finding and using OER. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

SVU-VOSE: A hybrid model of a virtual, open, and socially driven learning environment

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Khalil Ajami, Ola Haidar / August 29, 2019

Syrian Virtual University is implementing a hybrid model of learning called VOSE integrating three components: a virtual learning environment consists of online classroom sessions; an open learning environment grouping SVU's intellectual products; and a social learning environment for outclasses activities. A prototype of VOSE is implemented via the "Academic and Professional Support Program" that delivers support to SVU's students. VOSE adopts Web 2.0 technologies, in order to improve Learning experience in an institutionally accredited form. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

Makerspaces in Higher Education: An overview

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Brian Meyer / July 31, 2019

From accommodating multifarious needs, to providing a space for innovation and enquiry, makerspaces in education today serve to facilitate active, student-led enquiry through a room structured for experimentation. Unlike the traditional classroom context where one pedagogical style can have a tendency to predominate, a makerspace possesses the potential to provide multi-sensory engagement for students that anticipates and accommodates their needs, whilst providing real time feedback on reactions to hypothetical scenarios as they occur to allow a student to adapt their responses accordingly. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

A Messaging Framework for Online Educators

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Karen Gebhardt, Kelly N. McKenna / July 26, 2019

Messaging is often used to inform or clarify course content or expectations, remediate or encourage student performance, or to build community. Drawing on research related to best practices in online education and student-teacher interactions, this paper provides a theoretical framework for messaging based on two dimensions: motivation for the message and content of the message. Instructors can use this framework to implement and more precisely target messaging to improve student learning outcomes. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Be Motivated and Motivate: An Interview with John M. Keller

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Hasan Ucar, Alper Tolga Kumtepe / July 22, 2019

In this interview, we talked with John M. Keller, a prominent professor emeritus of educational psychology and learning systems at Florida State University, about learning motivation within the paradigm shift in global higher education and eLearning. Dr. Keller explains how technological opportunities in learning environments affect today learners' motivation and volition. He also shares opinions on the obstacles in motivating online learners and motivational challenges facing online instructors. » [Full Article]
TYPE: INTERVIEW, HIGHER EDUCATION

Multicultural Sensitivity in Course Design

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Amy Hilbelink / July 15, 2019

Because universities are moving more of their courses online in an effort to increase their education footprint and institutional impact by distributing to foreign students, many in online learning courses are becoming more diverse. As course designers, this impact should be taken into consideration when analyzing the student audience and designing any course. This article discusses recent trends in the global online audience, reminds us of assumptions made during the design process that may impact the multicultural audience, and provides suggestions for working around those assumptions. » [Full Article]
TYPE: DESIGN FOR LEARNING, HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

Use the 3 Rs to Guide Effective Teaching

By Emily Baxter, Jane Sutterlin, Maria Wherley / June 28, 2019

Relationships, relevance, and rigor, when fully addressed together, can frame best practices that will help to create an active online classroom environment where students may unleash their learning potential. In this article, we offer practical and easy ways to leverage technology to develop positive relationships, demonstrate relevance, and increase rigor in order to create an active online classroom where students are motivated to learn and understand the benefits of working hard and submitting high-quality work. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Intentionally Equitable Hospitality in Hybrid Video Dialogue: The context of Virtually Connecting

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Maha Bali, Autumm Caines, Rebecca J. Hogue, Helen J. DeWaard, Christian Friedrich / June 26, 2019

What special considerations do practitioners need in order to host equitable, hospitable, synchronous hybrid video conversations, where some participants are together in a room while others join remotely? Presented are intentionally equitable hospitality practices of onsite and virtual facilitators (buddies) that have emerged from experiences in Virtually Connecting, a grassroots movement that holds conversations at education conferences that include remote participants who cannot attend due to financial, social, logistical, health, or other reasons. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Copyright & Online Resources: It Doesn't Have To Be Complicated

By Nicole Snyder Dettmar / June 21, 2019

Copyright is a challenging subject area for instructors to ensure compliance with, and discerning it in the fair use of online instruction materials can be daunting. A clear definition of fair use under the Copyright Act and a helpful mnemonic to determine the four factors of it are discussed as well as open educational practices. These contribute to a thought process for instructors to make informed decisions about the use of copyrighted or open education online instruction materials with practical strategies and additional recommended technology tools to help. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Findings on Modeling as Impact to Practice from the HumanMOOC

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Heather A. Robinson, Maha Al-Freih, Whitney Kilgore, Patrice Torcivia Prusko / June 19, 2019

This article reports findings on the value of instructor modeling from a study on multiple iterations of the HumanMOOC course. After semi-structured interviews with participants who completed the course, coding, and analysis it was discovered that modeling of technologies and the course design using the community of inquiry (CoI) model were pivotal factors on impact to practice. Learning about the CoI through self-study, with peers, and online lectures, combined with the immersion of the framework in the LMS appears to be an effective combination and contributed to the actual, real-world implementation to the participant's classroom or work. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Rethinking Lurking

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Apostolos Koutropoulos, Sarah Honeychurch, Lenandlar Singh / May 29, 2019

Lurkers, non-participating, or minimally-participating members of an online community are a subject of interest to researchers. In the realm of eLearning communities nowhere is this more visible than in MOOCs. In this article we dive into some assumptions made of lurkers, and we advocate for the position that lurking can be a valuable learning approach depending on the learning context. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

A Commentary on the Paradigm Shift Toward Openness in Higher Education

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Suzan Koseoglu / May 9, 2019

This commentary explores paradigm shifts in education; in particular, the shift toward openness in higher education, drawing attention to critical perspectives and current debates related to open online learning and highlighting the importance of pedagogy in these discussions. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and e-learning: An ecological perspective

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Aras Bozkurt, Amy Hilbelink / May 1, 2019

The digital knowledge age has changed our world in inexplicable ways, and education is not immune to these changes. In a time when online technologies, networked learning spaces, mobile devices, cloud computing, and many other innovative tools have resulted in a paradigm shift, we need to revisit what is known about the current state of the art in higher education and e-learning. This special issue aims to reflect the changes in global higher education with a special focus on e-learning. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, INTERNATIONAL ONLINE EDUCATION

#HigherEdScope: A New Frontier in Digital Development

By Jon Ernstberger, Melissa A. Venable / April 22, 2019

#HigherEdScope was a co-hosted Periscope serial about online education that stretched the boundaries of the mobile broadcasting platform, through live sessions co-hosted by the authors. The topics covered were designed to inform online educators and administrators to a range of pedagogy, tools, and strategies. In this article, the authors share their experiences and exploration of live video, including failures and successes, in a professional development context. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Mindful Online Teaching and Learning: A Conversation with Tiffany Guske

By Melissa Venable / March 28, 2019

The 34th Annual Distance Teaching and Learning Conference featured a unique kickoff thanks to a mindfulness exercise led by Tiffany Guske. In calling all attendees to set an intention for their time at the conference, she helped them establish the foundation for a meaningful and productive experience. This post-conference interview with Tiffany provides a more in-depth look at the concept of mindfulness and specific strategies for applying this approach to our online teaching practice. » [Full Article]
TYPE: INTERVIEW, HIGHER EDUCATION

Changing the Narrative: New directions in online retention

By Andrea Gregg, Penny Ralston-Berg, Alison Carr-Chellman / March 5, 2019

The growth of online higher education has outpaced residential enrollments for the past six years and adults are a significant population of online learners. While certainly concerns about the efficacy of learning online have not fully gone away, online courses, and often entire online degrees, are now an established part of the contemporary higher education landscape. At the same time, persistence and retention remain important areas of concern for both online learners and the higher education institutions serving them. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Excited by E-Moderation? A Canadian Educator Shares Her Best Hacks

By Marla A. Zupan / February 22, 2019

Many of today's educators who seek new experiences are considering positions as electronic moderators (e-moderators). However, the transition from overseeing a physical classroom to managing a virtual learning environment can quickly become overwhelming and confusing. With limited supports and training opportunities available, e-moderators can struggle to find a balance between course content delivery and consistent candidate communication. This article has a twofold purpose. It first seeks to define and clarify the e-moderator role, particularly as it relates to online teacher professional development in Ontario. Next, the author outlines six strategies for success, targeting specific areas including setup, planning, time management, online presence and feedback. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT, MANAGEMENT

Creating Effective Collaborative Learning Groups in an Online Health Promotion Course

By Yan Huang / February 11, 2019

In this paper, an undergraduate-level online health promotion course is used to illustrate how to incorporate group learning experiences into courses that create productive, engaging, and skill-building environments for learners. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION

Five Ways to Flip the Online Classroom on Its Head

By Amy Winger / February 8, 2019

While online higher education learning has increased in availability and popularity, documented best practices have been slow to emerge. One learning practice showing promise is flipped classroom design. Research indicates higher-education flipped classrooms are associated with improved student retention and learner retention of content. With various online practices available to instructors, it is important to choose flipping practices that are supported through research while being attuned to the nature of online learning. Bloom's taxonomy provides a framework for creating active learning opportunities in the online classroom to strive to improve retention of both students and learning. » [Full Article]
TYPE: HIGHER EDUCATION