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Evolution of a Video-Learning Object Format

By Peter J. Fadde / March 2009

TYPE: EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES
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Comments (14) Instapaper

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Comments

  • Tue, 27 Jul 2010
    Post by chandru

    This is a very helpful article. Being new to consulting but in the tech communication industry for 15 years - it's valuable feedback from someone who has 'been there'. I really like the table showing the different types of e-learning and potential clients. Fortunately, it seems that I'm on a good path, as I'd find a way to do what I'm doing even if I wasn't paid for it. Cheers.

  • Sat, 15 May 2010
    Post by Peter Fadde

    A few years removed, the links to "Real Time Minutes" remain intact and Mr. Finkelstein has added several more RTM episodes. In episodes #21, 22, and 23 RTM goes international with "video metaphors" set in the Australian outback and the beaches of Bora Bora. As with all RTM episodes, Mr. Finkelstein uses the background as a metaphor for various aspects of conducting live, online events. The content of RTM episodes, even older ones, is of increasing interest as synchronous online learning grows. The video format of RTM continues to evolve. RTM (#23) steps up the video production value by going to wide-screen aspect ratio and higher resolution. RTM #23 also introduces multiple locations with transitions between scenes and picture-in-picture effects. As with all video learning, enhancements such as wide-screen and high-definition mean bigger file sizes to download or stream. Increased production value also means more time and trouble to produce. In addition, the charm and comfort of the single-shot RTM format may be lessened with enhanced production value. Many eLearning producers are in the position of deciding whether extra video production value is worth the extra effort. Mr. Finkelstein's "Real Time Minutes" give us a unique opportunity to consider.

  • Fri, 26 Mar 2010
    Post by Nabonita Roy

    You need just one mouse click and here Harold shares it all&Splendid! Having my own schedule makes me more flexible and gets me paid for consulting challenges and further grow.

  • Sun, 07 Jun 2009
    Post by Jenise Cook

    Harold and I now "follow" each other on Twitter; never have met in person. Maybe at a 2009 conference! His articule is "spot on", and confirms other research on freelancing/consulting. Andrea Coutu''s comment is valid. The consultant needs to weigh carefully that specific relationship. Like Harold says, it could open new doors for you. Having an emergency savings fund in advance helps with the decision.

  • Tue, 24 Mar 2009
    Post by Peter Fadde

    The format you describe is like some of the great cuisines that evolved to make up for some deficiency (i.e., low quality meat). The interesting thing is that, even though video is no longer as much of an online limitation, the FORMAT you evolved as a video work-around is still great: less expensive, more flexible, lower bandwidth -- a super soft skills scenario format (you should write an eLearn article about it!).

  • Sun, 22 Mar 2009
    Post by Keith Tyler-Smith

    Hi Peter, I enjoyed your article on video production. I also come out of a video /television production background and have been working in the online learning field for about 5 years now. I''m very interested in soft skills scenario dramatisations and have made quite a few. I started out wanting to use video, but at the time didn''t have the resources, was constrained by bandwidth considerations and at the time the web-based video formats used today were not available. Instead I used still photographs with models (I started with actors, but later began using colleagues) who were in some sort of relational scene. I then post produced the audio with professional voice actors then assembled them in a html wrapper. The great advantage of this is that it is mch faster to produce, it''s way cheaper, requires fewer technical skills and as you''ll know, because the audio carries most of the affective information, it works as well as video without the time consuming and technical skills that video requires. The key is the script and the audio, the stills set a visual context and so long as the framing and composition conforms to the rules of film / video grammar it all works surprisingly well, losing little if anything that might be achieved with video. Best regards

  • Mon, 29 Sep 2008
    Post by Harold Jarche

    I agree, understanding your own skills and motivation is an important aspect to consider before leaping into consulting. It''s not for everyone.

  • Sun, 28 Sep 2008
    Post by Angela Stringfellow

    Thanks for a realistic view of consulting. You are right about the barriers of entry to the field being lower than ever. It''s not even necessary to set up a formal business entity any longer if you work through a portable employer of record. But I believe that you should take a realstic look at your skills and your internal motivation before jumping into consulting.

  • Mon, 28 Apr 2008
    Post by Carole McCulloch

    I enjoyed your pearls of wisdom about a growing field of expertise - the freelance consultant. We''re ahead of the game...

  • Wed, 23 Jan 2008
    Post by Andrea Coutu

    Great article, Harold. I''ve made a note about this article on my Become a Consultant blog (www.consultantjournal.com). I disagree about pro bono work and taking shares, though. You''re a business, not a charity.

  • Wed, 23 Jan 2008
    Post by Prakash Bebington

    Harold Jarche has done what few "consultants" do ... share knowledge for FREE. True to his words, I wish this "good karma ... can go a long way in bringing (him) more work." A pithy, pertinent article on the subject, indeed. Thank you, Harold, and God bless :)

  • Wed, 23 Jan 2008
    Post by Prakash Bebington

    Harold Jarche has done what few "consultants" do ... share knowledge for FREE. True to his words, I wish this "good karma ... can go a long way in bringing (him) more work." A pithy, pertinent article on the subject, indeed. Thank you, Harold, and God bless :)

  • Wed, 28 Nov 2007
    Post by Laura Jaffrey

    This is a very helpful article. Being new to consulting but in the tech communication industry for 15 years - it''s valuable feedback from someone who has ''been there''. I really like the table showing the different types of e-learning and potential clients. Fortunately, it seems that I''m on a good path, as I''d find a way to do what I''m doing even if I wasn''t paid for it. Cheers.

  • Fri, 23 Nov 2007
    Post by alexanderhayes

    This is a brilliant article coming from an equally brilliant blogger, consultant and all round inspiration for those ( like me ) who battle silo''s and who network the networks as often as possible :-)