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Helping Students with Learning Disabilities Through Video-Based, Universally Designed Assessment

By Janet Zydney, Casey Hord, Kathy Koenig / May 31, 2020

The problem with many assessments is they impose barriers for students with learning disabilities who struggle with memory and information processing. Traditional assessments often present multiple pieces of information at one time through written text, which can challenge students who have difficulty processing, storing, and integrating multiple pieces of information simultaneously. Simple text-to-speech or computerized read-aloud accommodation cannot address these issues. This is unfair to these students and doesn?t provide an accurate measurement of their knowledge. Therefore, alternative measures that are accessible to students with learning disabilities must be developed. This article will highlight best practices and challenges in creating a video-based, universally designed assessment. » [Full Article]

Interview with Dr. Janet Zadina: Applying educational neuroscience research to instruction and elearning

By Les Howles / May 31, 2020

In this interview Dr. Janet Zadina discusses her work as an educational neuroscientist bridging brain research and pedagogy. She provides insights and advice on how instructors can design more learner-centered course experiences and use online technologies more effectively through a better understanding of neuroscience research related to learning. This interview spans a range of topics including contributions of brain research to learning science, common neuromyths, emotions and learning and how the digital information environment is impacting our brains and learning. » [Full Article]

What about online doctoral students? A review of e-Learning literature

By Kristina McGaha, Diana Hart, Wendy Aoki / April 30, 2020

Recent increases in accessibility, enrollment in e-learning, and diversification of distance learning format delivery (such as MOOCs) have put e-learning in a state of perpetual evolution. The result is a dynamic environment where research as recent as five years ago may no longer be relevant. A review of contemporary e-learning research is needed to understand current trends in the industry of e-learning as well as determine where further research is needed. This article describes six themes identified in the literature by reviewing journal articles centric to e-learning from 2014 to 2019 using qualitative content analysis. The themes represent what is largely covered in the literature (e-learning anxiety, e-learning pedagogy, and student-centered models), and what is underserved in the literature?namely the dissemination and investigation of online doctoral programs. » [Full Article]

Helping learners as they construct knowledge: How can instructors leverage research findings

By Viswa K. Viswanathan / March 31, 2020

The author presents research-based principles that can improve the recall of factual subject matter using existing features in LMS tools, apps, and other methods to meet targeted learning goals. » [Full Article]

Monetization of Knowledge in China: A new way for online learning?

By Xi Lin, Christy M. Rhodes / November 22, 2019

This paper introduces monetization of knowledge (MOK), an emerging online learning approach popular in China in recent years. The use of this innovative online learning method is growing among white-collar Chinese workers and appears to play a role in satisfying the needs of lifelong learners. » [Full Article]

Designing an Immersive Environment from the User's Perspective

By Michael A. Dzbenski / November 15, 2019

This review examines Casey Fictum's "VR UX: 100 Pages of VR UX, Design, Sound, Storytelling, Movement & Controls." Fictum creates a fast-paced, concise guide for readers looking to create virtual reality environments centered around the consumers who use the technology. The book interlaces technical information, imaginative storytelling, testing protocols, checklists, and amusing stories. This gives the reader perspective through the lens of a true expert in the fields of virtual reality, experience creation, head-mounted displays, and field-testing the technology. » [Full Article]

An Interview with Peter Smith on His New Book

By Amy Hilbelink / October 31, 2019

The future of higher education is one in which adult learners who continue to learn on the job will receive both credit and respect for their informal learning. In this interview Dr. Peter Smith of the University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) discusses his life work and new book. » [Full Article]

Year in Review: eLearn Magazine 2018-2019

By Simone C. O. Conceicao, Anita Samuel / October 30, 2019

eLearn Magazine had a successful year with an increase in the number of published articles, establishment of a new online system for managing the submission and peer review process, publication of two special issues, and a new partnership. » [Full Article]

Digital Transformation in Higher Education—Buzzword or Opportunity?

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Cerstin Mahlow, Andreas Hediger / September 20, 2019

We argue that, starting from a sophisticated understanding of "digital," we should develop a corresponding notion of "education" suitable to meet the challenges of the ongoing digital transformation. The central task for higher education institutions is to model the complex networks of digital skills (critical thinking, media literacy, cross-cultural competence, etc.) as a foundation for creating contextualized learning scenarios in the disciplines. The crucial success factor is the reunification of the classroom with the real world. » [Full Article]

Blended Learning Research: Components critical to student learning from a meta-analysis

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Leslie Cordie, Xi Lin, William Fowler, Michael Wooten / September 18, 2019

This meta-analysis study examined two broad categories related to student satisfaction: course content and instruction format. A systematic review of the literature using meta-analysis was conducted to both analyze and synthesize data across a large number of studies. The results show that in the higher-education environment, it is essential that both the method of interaction and the content be given purposeful attention during course development and presentation of course curricula. Future research should be aimed at identifying the critical subcomponents of these two categories. Additional research on course design factors in both the online and blended learning environments related to instruction should be conducted. » [Full Article]

Getting Engagement Right

By Clark Quinn / September 12, 2019

Nick Shackleton-Jones' book How People Learn proposes a new model of learning, and implications for design. While the model is questionable--the implications can be derived from more traditional models--the inferred design principles are spot on. This is a good read to think afresh about making learning meaningful. » [Full Article]

The Future of Education: Transforming higher education with integrated competency-based education

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Lisa Bosman / September 10, 2019

Over the past several years, competency-based education has been on the rise for offering vocational education, which prepares people to work in a variety of jobs such as a craft, a trade, or as a technician. However, little progress has taken place and few resources exist that show how to incorporate competency-based education into traditional bachelor's degree programs. The purpose of this article to highlight one university's new approach to transforming global higher education and eLearning with competency-based education. The article provides lessons learned and recommendations for others interested in getting on the higher education transformation bandwagon. » [Full Article]

Professional Development for Open Education: The usefulness of a cMOOC

By Jenni Hayman / September 6, 2019

There are two commonly identified obstacles to use of open educational resources (OER) and open educational practices (OEP) in global contexts. These obstacles are awareness and relevant skills. The focus of this article is participant experiences in a cMOOC designed to address these challenges. In June 2018, a group of post-secondary educators engaged in an open course they identified as useful for increasing their awareness and their capacity for finding and using OER. » [Full Article]

SVU-VOSE: A hybrid model of a virtual, open, and socially driven learning environment

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Khalil Ajami, Ola Haidar / August 29, 2019

Syrian Virtual University is implementing a hybrid model of learning called VOSE integrating three components: a virtual learning environment consists of online classroom sessions; an open learning environment grouping SVU's intellectual products; and a social learning environment for outclasses activities. A prototype of VOSE is implemented via the "Academic and Professional Support Program" that delivers support to SVU's students. VOSE adopts Web 2.0 technologies, in order to improve Learning experience in an institutionally accredited form. » [Full Article]

How to Teach Online: An interview with Dr. Angel Pazurek

By Suzan Koseoglu, Aras Bozkurt / August 14, 2019

This interview, which is about online teaching, was conducted with Angel Pazurek by Suzan Koseoglu and Aras Bozkurt. Pazurek is a senior lecturer and graduate faculty member in learning technologies at the University of Minnesota. She teaches and works on digital literacy, social media, online teaching and learning design, and research methodologies for learning technologies. In this interview, she discusses her experiences with online teaching by drawing attention to issues such as teaching philosophy and designing for the learner experience. » [Full Article]

Makerspaces in Higher Education: An overview

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Brian Meyer / July 31, 2019

From accommodating multifarious needs, to providing a space for innovation and enquiry, makerspaces in education today serve to facilitate active, student-led enquiry through a room structured for experimentation. Unlike the traditional classroom context where one pedagogical style can have a tendency to predominate, a makerspace possesses the potential to provide multi-sensory engagement for students that anticipates and accommodates their needs, whilst providing real time feedback on reactions to hypothetical scenarios as they occur to allow a student to adapt their responses accordingly. » [Full Article]

A Messaging Framework for Online Educators

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Karen Gebhardt, Kelly N. McKenna / July 26, 2019

Messaging is often used to inform or clarify course content or expectations, remediate or encourage student performance, or to build community. Drawing on research related to best practices in online education and student-teacher interactions, this paper provides a theoretical framework for messaging based on two dimensions: motivation for the message and content of the message. Instructors can use this framework to implement and more precisely target messaging to improve student learning outcomes. » [Full Article]

Be Motivated and Motivate: An Interview with John M. Keller

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Hasan Ucar, Alper Tolga Kumtepe / July 22, 2019

In this interview, we talked with John M. Keller, a prominent professor emeritus of educational psychology and learning systems at Florida State University, about learning motivation within the paradigm shift in global higher education and eLearning. Dr. Keller explains how technological opportunities in learning environments affect today learners' motivation and volition. He also shares opinions on the obstacles in motivating online learners and motivational challenges facing online instructors. » [Full Article]

Multicultural Sensitivity in Course Design

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Amy Hilbelink / July 15, 2019

Because universities are moving more of their courses online in an effort to increase their education footprint and institutional impact by distributing to foreign students, many in online learning courses are becoming more diverse. As course designers, this impact should be taken into consideration when analyzing the student audience and designing any course. This article discusses recent trends in the global online audience, reminds us of assumptions made during the design process that may impact the multicultural audience, and provides suggestions for working around those assumptions. » [Full Article]

Planning your Educational Podcast for an Online Course: Four genres to consider

By Christopher Drew / July 12, 2019

Podcasting for education has become increasingly popular in the past decade. This article explores four genres of podcast and how they can be used in online courses. The genres include: The Chat Show, The Narrative, The Tutorial and The Quick Burst. Each genre has its own strengths and weaknesses for supporting student learning, but each can also be employed for different learning tasks. Educators can seek out podcasts from each genre to incorporate in their teaching, or similarly inspire students to create their own podcasts after exploring the features of each genre. » [Full Article]

Academic Integrity in the Online Classroom

By Jacob A. Bane / July 3, 2019

As distance education grows, so does the need to ensure student identity and academic integrity. The academic integrity landscape continues to evolve, and universities have deployed a variety of methods to ensure integrity. The Ohio State University used a dual approach to ensure academic integrity across its distance education offerings employing a virtual proctoring solution and faculty education on authentic assessments. A solid foundation was set with this initiative; however, development will continue in order to meet the needs of a changing educational landscape. » [Full Article]

Use the 3 Rs to Guide Effective Teaching

By Emily Baxter, Jane Sutterlin, Maria Wherley / June 28, 2019

Relationships, relevance, and rigor, when fully addressed together, can frame best practices that will help to create an active online classroom environment where students may unleash their learning potential. In this article, we offer practical and easy ways to leverage technology to develop positive relationships, demonstrate relevance, and increase rigor in order to create an active online classroom where students are motivated to learn and understand the benefits of working hard and submitting high-quality work. » [Full Article]

Intentionally Equitable Hospitality in Hybrid Video Dialogue: The context of virtually connecting

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Maha Bali, Autumm Caines, Rebecca J. Hogue, Helen J. DeWaard, Christian Friedrich / June 26, 2019

What special considerations do practitioners need in order to host equitable, hospitable, synchronous hybrid video conversations, where some participants are together in a room while others join remotely? Presented are intentionally equitable hospitality practices of onsite and virtual facilitators (buddies) that have emerged from experiences in Virtually Connecting, a grassroots movement that holds conversations at education conferences that include remote participants who cannot attend due to financial, social, logistical, health, or other reasons. » [Full Article]

Copyright & Online Resources: It Doesn't Have To Be Complicated

By Nicole Snyder Dettmar / June 21, 2019

Copyright is a challenging subject area for instructors to ensure compliance with, and discerning it in the fair use of online instruction materials can be daunting. A clear definition of fair use under the Copyright Act and a helpful mnemonic to determine the four factors of it are discussed as well as open educational practices. These contribute to a thought process for instructors to make informed decisions about the use of copyrighted or open education online instruction materials with practical strategies and additional recommended technology tools to help. » [Full Article]

Findings on Modeling as Impact to Practice from the HumanMOOC

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Heather A. Robinson, Maha Al-Freih, Whitney Kilgore, Patrice Torcivia Prusko / June 19, 2019

This article reports findings on the value of instructor modeling from a study on multiple iterations of the HumanMOOC course. After semi-structured interviews with participants who completed the course, coding, and analysis it was discovered that modeling of technologies and the course design using the community of inquiry (CoI) model were pivotal factors on impact to practice. Learning about the CoI through self-study, with peers, and online lectures, combined with the immersion of the framework in the LMS appears to be an effective combination and contributed to the actual, real-world implementation to the participant's classroom or work. » [Full Article]

Rethinking Lurking

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Apostolos Koutropoulos, Sarah Honeychurch, Lenandlar Singh / May 29, 2019

Lurkers, non-participating, or minimally-participating members of an online community are a subject of interest to researchers. In the realm of eLearning communities nowhere is this more visible than in MOOCs. In this article we dive into some assumptions made of lurkers, and we advocate for the position that lurking can be a valuable learning approach depending on the learning context. » [Full Article]

Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed: How the realities are impacting our L&D reality

By Ann Rollins, Tom Pizer / May 16, 2019

The realities of learning are upon us. As learning practitioners, it is tough to keep on top of the emerging technology landscape. In this article, we define augmented, virtual, and mixed reality and provide use cases and context as to how each fits in the learning landscape based on our experience. We also share design considerations and a starting guide for practitioners as they begin to bring the realities into their learning ecosystems. » [Full Article]

A Commentary on the Paradigm Shift Toward Openness in Higher Education

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Suzan Koseoglu / May 9, 2019

This commentary explores paradigm shifts in education; in particular, the shift toward openness in higher education, drawing attention to critical perspectives and current debates related to open online learning and highlighting the importance of pedagogy in these discussions. » [Full Article]

Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and e-learning: An ecological perspective

Special Issue: Paradigm Shifts in Global Higher Education and eLearning

By Aras Bozkurt, Amy Hilbelink / May 1, 2019

The digital knowledge age has changed our world in inexplicable ways, and education is not immune to these changes. In a time when online technologies, networked learning spaces, mobile devices, cloud computing, and many other innovative tools have resulted in a paradigm shift, we need to revisit what is known about the current state of the art in higher education and e-learning. This special issue aims to reflect the changes in global higher education with a special focus on e-learning. » [Full Article]

Enhancing and Impacting the Online Classroom Environment with Infographics

By Hanadi Hamadi, Frederick R. Kates, George Raul Audi, Samantha A. Larson, Malcolm M. Kates / April 30, 2019

An infographic is a type of picture that, if done correctly, blends complex data with understandable design. College students today are inundated by visually stimulating screen-based environments. Infographics utilize that environment to enhance the process of summarizing educational material. Data visualization can provide students with multiple dimensions of competency including searching, systematic thinking, and effective interdisciplinary teamwork. » [Full Article]

#HigherEdScope: A New Frontier in Digital Development

By Jon Ernstberger, Melissa A. Venable / April 22, 2019

#HigherEdScope was a co-hosted Periscope serial about online education that stretched the boundaries of the mobile broadcasting platform, through live sessions co-hosted by the authors. The topics covered were designed to inform online educators and administrators to a range of pedagogy, tools, and strategies. In this article, the authors share their experiences and exploration of live video, including failures and successes, in a professional development context. » [Full Article]

Mindful Online Teaching and Learning: A Conversation with Tiffany Guske

By Melissa Venable / March 28, 2019

The 34th Annual Distance Teaching and Learning Conference featured a unique kickoff thanks to a mindfulness exercise led by Tiffany Guske. In calling all attendees to set an intention for their time at the conference, she helped them establish the foundation for a meaningful and productive experience. This post-conference interview with Tiffany provides a more in-depth look at the concept of mindfulness and specific strategies for applying this approach to our online teaching practice. » [Full Article]

Changing the Narrative: New directions in online retention

By Andrea Gregg, Penny Ralston-Berg, Alison Carr-Chellman / March 5, 2019

The growth of online higher education has outpaced residential enrollments for the past six years and adults are a significant population of online learners. While certainly concerns about the efficacy of learning online have not fully gone away, online courses, and often entire online degrees, are now an established part of the contemporary higher education landscape. At the same time, persistence and retention remain important areas of concern for both online learners and the higher education institutions serving them. » [Full Article]

Excited by E-Moderation? A Canadian Educator Shares Her Best Hacks

By Marla A. Zupan / February 22, 2019

Many of today's educators who seek new experiences are considering positions as electronic moderators (e-moderators). However, the transition from overseeing a physical classroom to managing a virtual learning environment can quickly become overwhelming and confusing. With limited supports and training opportunities available, e-moderators can struggle to find a balance between course content delivery and consistent candidate communication. This article has a twofold purpose. It first seeks to define and clarify the e-moderator role, particularly as it relates to online teacher professional development in Ontario. Next, the author outlines six strategies for success, targeting specific areas including setup, planning, time management, online presence and feedback. » [Full Article]

Engaging Learners in Online Environments Utilizing Universal Design for Learning Principles

By Aleksandra Hollingshead, Davin Carr-Chellman / February 15, 2019

Learner engagement in any instructional environment, including online, is critical to ensuring meaningful learning outcomes. Researchers discuss engagement as a complex construct consisting of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral domains. In e-learning, student engagement is difficult to achieve. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an instructional design framework focused on overcoming barriers to learning and providing learners with multiple ways to engage, receive instruction, and express learning. This framework is based on a premise of variability of all learners and designing learning that is flexible and systematically planned. » [Full Article]

Creating Effective Collaborative Learning Groups in an Online Health Promotion Course

By Yan Huang / February 11, 2019

In this paper, an undergraduate-level online health promotion course is used to illustrate how to incorporate group learning experiences into courses that create productive, engaging, and skill-building environments for learners. » [Full Article]

Five Ways to Flip the Online Classroom on Its Head

By Amy Winger / February 8, 2019

While online higher education learning has increased in availability and popularity, documented best practices have been slow to emerge. One learning practice showing promise is flipped classroom design. Research indicates higher-education flipped classrooms are associated with improved student retention and learner retention of content. With various online practices available to instructors, it is important to choose flipping practices that are supported through research while being attuned to the nature of online learning. Bloom's taxonomy provides a framework for creating active learning opportunities in the online classroom to strive to improve retention of both students and learning. » [Full Article]

Instructional Technology: Avoiding the Golden Hammer

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By B. Jean Mandernach / December 31, 2018

In this Special Issue of eLearn Magazine, we examine the value and impact of instructional technology for addressing specific challenges faced by educators in the online classroom. With an emphasis on practical utility, authors share technology tools that have aligned effectively with their pedagogical needs to produce positive teaching and learning outcomes. » [Full Article]

Using Multimodal, Asynchronous Discussion Forums in Public (aka: Why My Students Blog)

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Nicole M. Zumpano / December 31, 2018

Blogging in online courses has advantages for students and the field of education. Read why I require blogging in my technology in education graduate courses. » [Full Article]

Adaptive Hypermedia Content

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Derek Luch / December 31, 2018

This brief literature review is as an introduction to the adaptive hypermedia possibilities in the education field. As digital learning technology advances and more complex algorithms hosted online, the practical aspects of machine learning may be of interest to practicing educators. » [Full Article]

Asynchronous Video-Based Discussions in the Online Classroom

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Katrina M. Wehr / December 31, 2018

This article presents a review of research surrounding asynchronous video communication and its impact on social presence in online courses. The author includes a narrative of firsthand experience as an instructional designer implementing asynchronous multimodal discussions, along with a survey of student perspectives as well as the instructor's. Recommendations for improvement in future implementations are also included. » [Full Article]

Screencasting Technology to Increase Engagement in Online Higher Education Courses

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Shaunna Waltemeyer, Jeff Cranmore / December 31, 2018

This paper reviews screencasting software as a means to establish and maintain student engagement and authentic relationships in higher education virtual classrooms. While student engagement is often a challenge with virtual classrooms new technologies are available that allow teachers to provide audio and video feedback to students. Screencasting software can be used for individual feedback, demonstrations, and modeling. The paper concludes with recommendations for future research. » [Full Article]

Integrating Technology: An innovative approach to improving online discussion boards

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Frederick R. Kates, Hanadi Hamadi, Malcolm M. Kates, Samantha A. Larson, George Raul Audi / December 31, 2018

As the online education environment continues to grow, the use of online mechanisms for discussion have become important for enhancing the development of a learning community. Changing the way online discussion boards are used today, from teacher-generated prompts to student-created videos, which include a discussion question, may improve the learning experience and engagement. Therefore, there is always more to learn and more to try with instructional technology. » [Full Article]

Learning is Social with Zoom Video Conferencing in your Classroom

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Jane Sutterlin / December 31, 2018

Zoom has become a robust, indispensable and reliable video conferencing tool for the way we work, teach and learn together. When we create a positive social learning environment with supportive faculty and student relationships, we are able to retain our online students. Zoom connects easily across room systems, desktops and mobile devices to seamlessly bring together our various campus sites and long-distance participants. Utilizing the numerous features of zoom creates an authentic online teaching environment. » [Full Article]

Web Conferencing Supports the Wake Tech High School Equivalency Program

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Chris Roddenberry, Maria Fister / December 31, 2018

The High School Equivalency Program (HEP) is a national initiative, funded by the U.S. Department of Education that helps migrant workers obtain high school equivalency diplomas. Wake Technical Community College?s HEP program recently transitioned to a fully online model supported by the use of the Adobe Connect web conferencing software, providing immediate benefits to both instructors and students. This paper provides a roadmap for other non-traditional educational programs that want to transition to online environments. » [Full Article]

Learning Efficiency of Video-based Learning

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Shulong Yan, Emily Baxter / December 31, 2018

What role should video play in online learning? That is the question that learning designers and teaching faculty face more and more when designing online instruction. In this paper we will share what we learned about students' learning experience in a video-based online course. We will propose a new perspective for looking at video as an instructional tool, based on our findings using a qualitative research method. » [Full Article]

Using Flipgrid to Increase Students' Connectedness in an Online Class

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Michelle Bartlett / December 31, 2018

Flipgrid, a free video discussion forum tool, increases students' perceptions of connectedness in the online classroom. Video discussion forums embedded in an online course can be used in many ways to connect instructors to students, and students to their peers. Embedding a tool that brings voice, tone, and body language to the online classroom strengthens connectedness and can increase civility. » [Full Article]

#teachingwithtwitter: Tweeting to foster online engagement and learning

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Catherine Honig / December 31, 2018

Research on teaching with Twitter points to a variety of educational benefits to engagement and learning. Tweeting encourages a backchannel discussion of class topics and activities, and it has the potential to expand learning in interesting ways. A constellation of emerging best practices offers helpful guidance for instructors and paves the way for effective implementation in both online and face-to-face courses. » [Full Article]

Using 'Code Words': A simple gamification technique to guide students to instructor personalized resources

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By John Steele, Samia Humphrey / December 31, 2018

The purpose of this article is to offer ideas using a simple gamification technique of the ?code word? to connect students to vital classroom content and or personalized instructor materials. However, there is no value in this material if instructors are unable to guide their students to it. Gamification can provide ways to engage students in seeking out these beneficial resources that can help them be successful in the course. » [Full Article]

Optimizing Feedback Delivery with Text-Expanders

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Heather Moore / December 31, 2018

This article presents strategies to optimize usage of text-expanders. Online instructors need to deliver high-quality feedback on a high volume of assignments in a short span of time, yet high volume means that feedback delivery can be a repetitive task as students make similar mistakes. When repetitive tasks are combined with time pressure, feedback quality degradation may result. Text-expanders are one possible tool to maintain quality while improving time efficiency. » [Full Article]

Using Texting Tools to Reinforce Communication in the Online Classroom

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Shelley Evans, Marny Rhodes, Alecia Anderton / December 31, 2018

Texting tools are useful communication tools used by higher education instructors to send short messages to students or guardians. The tool can also be a vehicle for enhancing student engagement and communication by sending reminders, words of encouragement, and other announcements. Some texting tools are accessible to students with disabilities thanks to the voice-to-text feature, highlighted in this article. Challenges to using texting tools are addressed and best practices for implementation are described. » [Full Article]

Standing Out: Online content marketing for online programs

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Ted Cross, Laura Polk / December 31, 2018

As digital education becomes more accepted by learners and more institutions offer programs online, getting the word out about programs has become increasingly challenging. This paper offers a case study and recommendations for online content marketing of online programs. » [Full Article]

Using Screen Recording Platforms to Increase Instructor Presence in an Online Classroom

Special Issue: Instructional Technology in the Online Classroom

By Seanan Kelly, Charles Banaszewski / December 31, 2018

Recent advances such as video and audio conferencing, online real-time chat and instant messaging features have created synchronous learning opportunities in online classrooms. Use of screen recording tools specifically, provide the ability to make short recordings, which provide a quick and personal way to respond to individuals or groups. Additionally, when utilized for feedback purposes, screen recordings enhance instructor presence in the classroom, provide one-to-one, teacher-student exchanges reducing the virtual distance between instructors and students. » [Full Article]

What Do College Faculty And Businesses Think About Online Education?

By Melissa Andrews / December 3, 2018

Since 1994, student enrollments in online education programs have dramatically increased. As colleges and businesses expand their use of e-learning, it has become more and more important to find cost-effective ways to deliver instruction and training that will meet student and business needs. Perceptions of what constitutes quality programs by faculty members, the community, administrators and businesses all vary making planning for the future even more difficult. Little research in the field also compounds the complexity of knowing which strategy will provide colleges and businesses the quality standards that it requires. This indecision and lack of information is often what leads to poor training practices for online instructors, limited knowledge of program components by hiring managers and biases about student capabilities when comparing an online to traditional programs. » [Full Article]

Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Online Classroom

By Christy M. Rhodes, Steven W. Schmidt / November 30, 2018

The concept of culturally responsive teaching has long been associated with the traditional, face-to-face classroom. However, the growth of distance education has meant that traditional classrooms are being replaced by online courses, and educators who were used to teaching in face-to-face classrooms now find themselves in a very different situation of teaching online. Culturally responsive teaching is important in all classrooms, and it can be done online. This article examines basic principles of culturally responsive teaching in the context of elearning. It focuses on practical ideas for instructors interested in developing their own culturally responsive online teaching skills. » [Full Article]

eLearn Magazine: A retrospective on 2017-2018

By Simone C. O. Conceicao, Anita Samuel / October 12, 2018

eLearn Magazine entered a new period in July 2017. The success of the magazine over this past year has been a team effort. The ultimate goal for this past year was to push the boundaries of eLearning and technology and explore innovations to further the conversation around strategies in eLearning. » [Full Article]

Openness in Education: An Interview with Martin Weller

By Suzan Koseoglu, Aras Bozkurt / September 18, 2018

This interview about openness in education was conducted with Martin Weller by Suzan Koseoglu and Aras Bozkurt. Weller is a Professor of Educational Technology at the Open University (UK) and the president of The Association for Learning Technology. A prominent figure in the move toward opening up education, Weller has published many articles and four books on topics related to open and online education, including The Digital Scholar and The Battle for Open. » [Full Article]

Uncovering the Evidence Behind Common Learning Myths and Misconceptions

By Praveen Krishnamurti / September 12, 2018

In his book Millennials, Goldfish & Other Training Misconceptions?, Dr. Clark Quinn systematically analyzes the most common myths, misconceptions, and superstitions currently prevalent in the theories and practice of adult learning. He presents a compelling case for relying on scientific methodologies while examining eLearning theories and concepts, regardless of the source from which they emanate. » [Full Article]

The Rise of Learning Engineering

By Ellen Wagner, Jodi Lis / August 7, 2018

The Industry Connections Industry Consortium on Learning Engineering (ICICLE) was formed in 2017 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) as a community-driven platform across sectors to advocate and support the development of the professional and academic disciplines of learning engineering. This article is an invitation to participate. » [Full Article]

Quality Control Versus Academic Freedom: Walk the line

By Miriam RB Abbott, Jami M. Nininger, Peggy Shaw / July 30, 2018

Colleges incorporate online education using a variety of approaches. For some, there is little oversight applied to course design. At other institutions, instructors manage pre-written courses and serve primarily in a grading role. As online education expands, institutions must develop policies that balance the demands of academic freedom and student-centered design, the latter of which is valued by accreditors. Limited elements of standardization, including course design templates and grading rubrics, can help institutions demonstrate consistency and quality while preserving faculty academic freedom in course content. » [Full Article]

Better Assessment

By Clark Quinn / July 13, 2018

Linda B. Nilson provides the rationale for, and mechanisms to achieve, a better approach to assignments. Utilizing competencies, criteria, and a refocus of ownership, she argues for a systematic change, illustrated with many examples. There has been an ongoing search for criteria to improve assessments, and this is a cogent call about why and how to do it. » [Full Article]

CFISD: A school district banking on technology to forge academic success

By Frankie Jackson, Daniele Loffreda / May 31, 2018

With the proliferation of digital learning technology in the classroom, combined with the bandwidth needs of today's tech dependent Gen Z student, educational networks, which provide the backbone for critical campus Wi-Fi services, are strained all over the country. In order to access bandwidth-intensive digital learning tools and multimedia content that help students reach their full potential, reliable and robust connectivity is required. » [Full Article]

Need a Thought Leader?

By Yvonne Phelps, Heather Welzant / May 11, 2018

This article explores the characteristics of the type of thought leadership needed to drive high quality design and delivery of online/hybrid programs. The thought leaders of today must constantly scan the higher-education environment, as well as the world at large, to look for new and innovative ways to practice effective quality assurance. Further, today's higher education leaders must not only be up to speed on the current quality assurance debate, but they also need to be thought leaders in the disciple of quality assurance. The article includes examples of thought leaders currently paving the way for more innovative and effective practices. » [Full Article]

12 Steps Toward Immersive Learning

By Dov Jacobson / April 19, 2018

Presented is an overview of virtual and augmented reality techniques. This article is tailored for learning professionals who find mixed reality interesting but confusing. Included are a dozen features that differentiate points on the Mixed Reality Spectrum, enabling readers to choose the ones that are best suited for learners. » [Full Article]

South by Southwest 2018: Reflections for e-Learn Magazine

By Alison Carr-Chellman / April 4, 2018

This multimedia article offers some reflections on the South by Southwest 2018 conference for e-Learn Magazine readers/watchers. The South by Southwest conference is held in Austin each spring, and represents the best of the arts and technology melding with high profile speakers such as Bernie Sanders, Melinda Gates, and Bill Hader. This article reviews several days of experiences at SXSW EDU and SXSW including interviews, information from the EDU Playground, and SXSW exposition show floor. » [Full Article]

Implementing Blended Learning the Right Way

By Kevin E. Kessler / March 30, 2018

You may have read the quintessential texts on blended learning, the 'why', the need for disruption, the types of models, etc. However, you've never read a workbook like this. The Blended Course Design Workbook is the most important book any school (or teacher) should own in order to implement blended learning the right way. This book provides steps, checks, and explanations on how to build or improve a blended-learning program. This is not a book of theory or persuasive change, this is a how-to book that needs to be on every shelf of every school. » [Full Article]

Promoting Student Engagement with Smartphone Technology

By Caesar Perkowski, Cortney McLeod / March 26, 2018

This article presents specific, tangible ways that professors can improve the success rate of their hybrid and online courses in rural settings in the state of Georgia, where the student populations are largely lower socio-economic and African-American. The goal is for this project to add to the overall discussion of pedagogical theory, as it relates to online and hybrid education. » [Full Article]

Online Learning: Bridging the Cultural Gaps

By Alia Arafeh / March 2, 2018

The pervasiveness of online education created opportunities for learners across the world to pursue their higher education at accredited universities of their choice. However, this form of education generated several challenges for both educators and learners due to several cultural differences. As the world is a global village, it has become crucial to satisfy the academic and professional needs of these learners who aspire to get the best scholastic aptitude. Yet, there are many benefits of cultural diversity for both educators and learners. The rich examples of the impact of culture on online learning stated throughout "Culture and Online Learning: Global perspectives and research" help understand the effect of cultural differences on creating a successful and effective learning environment, which embraces online students and provides them with the tools to assist their success. » [Full Article]

Four Questions to Ask When Using YouTube in the Classroom

By Christopher Drew / February 20, 2018

With the rise of the flipped classroom concept, videos from platforms such as YouTube are increasingly being embedded in education courses. Teachers use videos they find online not only as stimulus materials, but also because they can explicitly teach concepts to learners. This article proposes teachers reflect on the pedagogical value of such videos before using them as educational materials. Based on constructivist principles that emphasize active learning and critical thinking, four simple questions are presented for teachers to ask about videos that are designed to explicitly teach before selecting them as tools that do teaching their courses. » [Full Article]

Openness in Education and Digital Scholarship: An interview with Bonnie Stewart

By Aras Bozkurt, Suzan Koseoglu / February 6, 2018

Bonnie Stewart, a researcher at University of Prince Edward Island, Canada, sat down with eLearn Magazine to discuss openness in education, scholarship, and Antigonish 2.0. » [Full Article]

Getting Serious about eLearning

By Clark N. Quinn / January 18, 2018

Are you ready to take eLearning to the next level? Do you want to be a part of meaningful eLearning? The Serious eLearning Manifesto is the first step forward. Clark Quinn provides an inside look at what led to the creation of the manifesto and how we can all be a part of the movement for serious eLearning. » [Full Article]

The Negentropic Professor and the Online Curriculum

By Sydney Freeman, Allen Kitchel, Alison Carr-Chellman / November 28, 2017

Entropy, the notion of a gradual decline toward disorder, randomness and, eventual collapse, affects all human, living and social systems, including universities. While strictly speaking, entropy is a measure rather than a construct; it has been understood in more metaphorical colloquial ways and has been applied to concepts within the social sciences, such as education. One of the primary negentropic forces in today's university is the enrollment increases that online classes bring as a form of order and integration. This paper focuses on negentropy as it is lived out through online learning, strategically applied in higher education contexts. » [Full Article]

Innovation. Inspiration. Connection.

By Anita Samuel / October 24, 2017

The Distance Teaching and Learning Conference 2017 brought together distance educators, instructional designers, and administrators for three days of innovation, inspiration, and connection. Take a look at what happened at DTL 2017. You might want to include this in your 2018 schedule. » [Full Article]

An Interview with Shai Reshef--President, University of the People

By Donna Gardner Liljegren, Melissa Venable / October 4, 2017

The University of the People is a non-profit, tuition-free, accredited U.S. online university, with a mission to provide accessible, affordable, high-quality higher education. Current president and founder Shai Reshef shares his insights into how the organization is reaching this goal through strategic partnerships and a mostly volunteer work force, laying the groundwork for a new educational model. » [Full Article]

Gamification, Education and E-learning: An interview with Andrzej Marczewski

By Aras Bozkurt / September 11, 2017

In this interview from Aras Bozkurt, one of the leading gamification experts, Andrzej Marczewski, discusses the definition of gamification, its impact on and its application in e-learning, and some insights about the future of the gamification. » [Full Article]

How Elearning Practitioners can Find Value in Augmented and Virtual Reality Technology

By Jeremy Manjorin / August 29, 2017

This book review of Practical Augmented Reality written by Steve Aukstakalnis explores the practical side of augmented and virtual realities for the professional learner. » [Full Article]

eLearn Magazine: Advancing forward

By Simone Conceicao, Anita Samuel / July 21, 2017

eLearn Magazine is entering a new period and exciting changes lie ahead. » [Full Article]

e-Learning in the Age of Betsy DeVos

By Allison Carr-Chellman / March 9, 2017

Betsy DeVos is the new U.S. Secretary of Education, having been confirmed by not just a razor-thin measure, but rather by a tie-breaking vote by Vice President Mike Pence that was unprecedented for a presidential cabinet appointment. What are the likely potentials and possibilities for e-learning in the new era of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos? It's worth exploring what we might be able to anticipate for e-learning in the coming era. » [Full Article]

A Fundamental Look at Cultural Diversity and the Online Classroom

By Karen Milheim / February 28, 2017

Understanding the unique differences between online and traditional classroom environments, and how culture manifests itself within each setting, can help shape a positive educational experience for students. The purpose of this article is to provide a broad overview of how cultural diversity can influence the online classroom. The author suggests ways instructional professionals can work towards improving the online learning experience for culturally diverse student groups with respect to communication, course design, and acknowledgement of differences. » [Full Article]