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Learner on the Orient Express

By Lisa Neal / May 2008

TYPE: OPINION
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Agatha Christie captured the glamour of travel in her mystery novels (though some of her passengers did not arrive at their intended destinations, if you know what I mean). But few of the people in her books were working while traveling, with the notable exception of detective work. Irene McAra-McWilliam, who recently gave the opening plenary at CHI 2008 in Florence, said in a new eLearn Magazine interview that "many places are excellent spaces for thought," and mentioned travel as one of her optimal work environments.

What does this have to do with e-learning, you might ask? One of the main target audiences of e-learning programs is working adults, who, with or without families, are incredibly busy people.

Given that the length of a day can't be extended, it is a challenge for many people to get their coursework done. Inspired by Irene's insights, I propose travel can provide the concentration necessary for learning. It also has great advantages over trying to do coursework at the office and risking a manager's wrath, or trying to minimize interruptions in the evening at home, when loved ones want attention.

Here are some reasons why travel is advantageous to learning:

  • You get things done in preparation for a trip so that you don't have to think about them while away. The bills are paid, the children's schedule is in someone else's hands, and you have everything you need on hand. How refreshing—and mind-clearing.
  • You are in transition. While you are actually someplace at all times, the place you are in while traveling is inconsequential. Thus you don't have to think about it. (Have you noticed how the monitors on trans-Atlantic flights are constantly reminding you where you are? It's a great reason to travel first class: to have control over what you view—or don't view.)
  • You have few distractions. I know someone who met her husband in the seat next to her on a plane, but, in general, most people I know ignore their traveling companions unless they are ones they selected themselves. Ellen Goodman, a syndicated columnist, wrote—in 1984! —about how terrible it was when planes first added phones: "Now even this refuge has been violated." But most people don't talk on the phone on planes and even trains have quiet cars.

I find Amtrak's Acela from Boston to New York the perfect place to work. Perhaps the ambient noise and rhythmic motion even enhance my thought processes.

In daily life, however, there are not always opportunities to travel that coincide with the 20-page term paper. My next suggestion, then, is to commute using public transportation. While my first point above is minimized in daily commuting, the others still hold. Not only is it greener than driving alone, but there are uninterrupted blocks of time to complete coursework. And if memory serves, Agatha Christie never knocked off a passenger on a commuter train.



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ADDITIONAL READING

    Lisa Neal
  1. Learn to apologize for fun and profit
  2. Of web hits and Britney Spears
  3. Advertising or education?
  4. Five questions…for Matt DuPlessie
  5. Back to the future
  6. Serious games for serious topics
  7. Five (or six) questions...for Irene McAra-McWilliam
  8. When will e-learning reach a tipping point?
  9. Online learning and fun
  10. In search of simplicity
  11. "Spot Learning"
  12. Q&A with Saul Carliner
  13. eLearning and fun
  14. Everything in moderation
  15. The basics of e-learning
  16. Is it live or is it Memorex?
  17. The Value of Voice
  18. Predictions for 2006
  19. Five Questions...for Christopher Dede
  20. Five Questions... for John Seely Brown
  21. Five questions...for Shigeru Miyagawi
  22. "Deep" thoughts
  23. 5 questions... for Richard E. Mayer
  24. Designing usable, self-paced e-learning courses
  25. Want better courses?
  26. Just "DO IT"
  27. Five questions...
  28. Formative evaluation
  29. Senior service
  30. Blogging to learn and learning to blog
  31. My life as a Wikipedian
  32. Five questions...for Elliott Masie
  33. The stripper and the bogus online degree
  34. Five questions...for Lynn Johnston
  35. Five questions...for Tom Carey
  36. Not all the world's a stage
  37. Five questions...for Karl M. Kapp
  38. Five questions...for Larry Prusack
  39. Five questions...for Seb Schmoller
  40. Do distance and location matter in e-learning?
  41. Why do our K-12 schools remain technology-free?
  42. Music lessons
  43. How to get students to show up and learn
  44. Q&A
  45. Blended conferences
  46. Predictions for 2002
  47. Learning from e-learning
  48. Storytelling at a distance
  49. Q&A with Don Norman
  50. Talk to me
  51. Q&A with Diana Laurillard
  52. Do it yourself
  53. Degrees by mail
  54. Predictions for 2004
  55. Predictions For 2003